"Catch Cancer before it catches You"


ENGLISH
What is it What causes it Defence measures called for
How to detect it How to treat it Cancer in men
Cancer in women Cancer in children Cancer and you
Caution Facts about cancer

   


CANCER IN WOMEN

1. Do more women than men die of cancer?

No. The misconception that cancer is primarily a woman’s disease is due to the frequency of cancer of the breast and cancer of the reproductive organs in women, in comparison with the more varied occurrence of cancer in men.

2. Does cancer occur more frequently among married or unmarried women?

Reports from death certificates show that above the age of 40, the cancer death rate is higher among single women than among married women of the same ages. Single women have higher death rates from cancer of the breast and married women have more cancer of the cervix. Physicians believe that having the first child around the age of 20 is preventive against cancer of the breast. Multiple sexual partners increase the risk of cancer of the cervix.

3. Is there danger in watching a lump in the breast to "see what happens"?

Yes. This is a very grave danger. This is the most important factor in the control of cancer and waiting to "see what happens" may permit a curable cancer to become incurable. This may allow it to spread to other parts of body and make the treatment more difficult.

4. Are all breast lumps cancerous?

No. Only small percentages of lumps are cancerous. Careful physical examination and mammography can differentiate benign from malignant lump. Biopsy & FNAC of lump by a competent pathologist can clinch the diagnosis.

5. What precautions should be taken to avoid cancer of the breast?

Every woman above the age of 40 should have her breasts examined annually by a physician. Every woman after the age of 35 years should be taught how to examine her own breasts (monthly after her periods). Mammography should be encouraged at the age of 40 years onwards and then every 2 years. Soon we will have genetic markers to detect high risk group of women who are likely to develop breast or ovarian cancer.

6. How should you examine your breasts?

Self examination of the breast should be done in the following ways after periods are over. Post menopausal women should examine their breasts every month.

  1. Sit or stand in front of a mirror, with your arms relaxed at your sides and examine your breasts carefully for any changes in size and shape. Look for any puckering or dimpling of the skin and for any discharge or change in the nipples. Compare one breast with the other.
  2. Raise both your arms over your head and look for exactly the same changes. See if there is any change since you last examined your breasts.
  3. You should feel for a lump or thickening in the breast tissues. Lie down on you bed or in the floor. Put a pillow or a bath towel under you left shoulder and place you left hand under you head. With the fingers of your fight hand held together flat, press gently but firmly with small circular motions to feel the inner upper quarter of your left breast, starting at you breast bone and going outward toward the nipple line. Also feel the areas around the nipple.
  4. With the same gentle pressure next feel the lower, inner parts of your breast.
  5. Now bring your left arm down to your side and still using the flat part of your fingers, feel under your armpit.
  6. Use the same gentle pressure to feel the upper, outer quarter of your breast from the nipple line to where your arm is resting.
  7. And finally, feel the lower, outer section of your breast, proceeding from the outer part to the nipple.
  8. Repeat the entire procedure, for the right breast.

7. What precautions should be taken to avoid cancer of the uterus (womb)?

Have all unnatural vaginal discharges investigated. Up to the age of thirty five have an annual examination by the Gynaecologist. Bleeding after the age of 50 years (after menopause) calls for a physician’s examination at once. Avoid multiple sexual partners. Cervix cancer can be prevented by screening.

8. Do uterine fibroids ever become cancerous?

Fibroid tumours very rarely undergo malignant changes.

 
 
What is it What causes it Defence measures called for
How to detect it How to treat it Cancer in men
Cancer in women Cancer in children Cancer and you
Caution Facts about cancer
 

Published and issued by STATE CANCER SOCIETY OF MEGHALAYA, for public interest.
For further information you may contact the Member Secretary of the Society, at the Cancer Detection Centre, Civil Hospital Shillong.
Phone : 0364-2500815 (O), Email : scsm@shillong.meg.nic.in